Transformative Travel


After  returning from 2 weeks of an incredible journey that spanned the Mediterranean, Paris and a trip through memory lane in my hometown in NJ,  I can say I have once again been transformed.

This trip concludes the 15,000 miles I have now gone on for my book tour which started last fall in Seattle.

Travel always changes perspective.  How can It not?  You step outside your day-to-day world,  you break habitual ritual and try on new ones.  The ones that ‘work’ often ‘stick’ and become an integrated part of you.

Touring the sights of Rome, Dubrovnik, Olympia, Athens, Sicily, Ephesus and Paris I time travelled and contemplated what mattered to the ancient peoples of this planet.

Meeting with locals, I saw the legacy of such beliefs in their views, religions, food, customs and depicted in their languages.  What words mattered and why.

For instance, in Italian, the word for shellfish is “Fruita del Mar” or ‘fruit of the sea’.  Did that mean that in times past shellfish was so abundant it was like picking fruit from the ocean?  Did it mean there was more of a reverence and respect for this food that became a staple in the diet?

Another phrase in Italian, “Bon Giorno!” for Good Morning or in French, “Bon Jour!” literally means ‘Good Day”…setting forth an intention for the day ahead.

In English we say it every day, “Good Morning or Good Night” but what are we saying when not  running on automatic…basically,  to have the best possible experience of the moment, because that’s all we really have.

During this journey of touring 6-8 hours each day I embraced that moment-to-moment appreciation.

So as I return to my life in Seattle, my consciousness is rooted in the moment.  Over this week I’ll be writing stories about each of the cities visited, reflections and contemplations compiled with a scrapbook of photos.

And in this moment I am listening to the early morning bird song greeting me to have a good day.

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